Hug a Social Media Curator!

(This post is the 4th part of a five part series about participation in the world of Social Media)

It’s a zoo out there!

I’ve got 45,000 unread emails, 1,750 unread notices in facebook, and countless tweets that come flying by me each day.

The Social Web is a crazy place.  Everywhere you look, “Creators” are busy creating content and “Consumers” are seeking the latest and greatest.  Who makes it all work?

The Social Media Curator.

The word Curator normally applies to a museum executive or someone who manages a collection.  Going back to when I studied Latin, it comes from the word cūrā, meaning to care for or attend to.

Social Media Curators care for and attend to the best of the Social Web.  They save us all time.  They make Web 2.0 worthwhile.

It’s time to hug a social media Curator!

When others click away from something they like and move on, the Curators among us share it, retweet it, bookmark it, list it, or forward it.  When they find people that serve niches, they follow them, list them, and introduce them to the world.

They are the only reason that my twitter stream and Flipboard app actually work. (hint, if you don’t “get” twitter, it’s because you don’t know any curators)

Without Curators, we are stuck digging through the billions of updates each month just to find something worth reading (besides family or celebrity updates).  With curators, the best of the best in our field rises to the top.

It’s time to thank the curators!

Have a great night,

Aaron@Biebert

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Here are some different types of curators I’ve relied on.  Who are yours?  (Please share and I’ll check them out)

Like this article?  Check out  “Web 2.0 – Why Sharing is Caring”  or subscribe to “Thoughts from an 8pm Warrior” via email

Social Comatose? Time for Sleeping Leaders to Awake!

(This post is the 2nd in a five part series about participation in the world of Social Media)

Any leader who hasn’t embraced the social web by now must be near retirement or in a coma.

Either that, or they’re in China.

I don’t have a problem with 90 year old retirees ignoring Social Media.  However, the rest of us will have to learn to live in a world that gets its news and information from the internet and the millions of blogs, tweets, updates, and posts that are shared each day.  They are the mail, magazines, and conferences of a new age.

The rise of Social Media cannot be ignored.

Last year I volunteered to form the social media program for a large healthcare association. The goal was to engage the membership, improve communication, spark collaboration, and let non-members know what they were missing.

As part of the plan we began discussing upcoming conferences, sharing pictures, and sharing ideas and best practices.  All good things.

However, there is always someone who doesn’t get it.

The CFO of a large healthcare system informed me that he was irritated about this change.  His entire group of employees (thousands of people) was not able to access the association’s information on Linkedin, Facebook, and Twitter, but then he eagerly defended his policy of blocking all social media sites.  He didn’t want his employees wasting time.

He didn’t get it.

In reality, what he must have not wanted was informed employees, cutting edge information, reduced consulting costs, and free advertising or recruiting.  He was too afraid of letting go.

It looks like he’s in good company.

According to the the annual PwC CEO survey, only 57% of  CEOs indicate they will not “significantly change” their strategies to meet new realities of social media usage by their customers.  Even more disturbing, 10% of marketing leaders (the most educated on this topic) still indicate that social media is not important to their company.

They’re sleeping and won’t see the iceberg ahead!

Of the four types of participation on the social web, acting like you’re in a coma is the only one that I believe is wrong.

Here’s why:

So much information is available on Facebook, Twitter, and Linkedin to help organizations be quicker, smarter, and faster.  Ignoring this information amounts to leadership malpractice.  Using healthcare as an example, just look at these Social Media tools that are available for:

No matter what industry you work in, there are similar resources.  If you know someone who is asleep at the wheel of a department, division, or organization, it’s time to wake them up.

The world has changed.

Have a great night,

Aaron@Biebert

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The 4 C’s in Social Media Participation

There are only four ways of participating on the social web. You can choose to be:

Some people are Comotose, and will be shocked when they wake up to see what the world has become. Unfortunately, they may also be unemployed, uneducated, and behind the curve.

Consumers spend most of their time reading, watching, and consuming the materials that are made by the Creators and shared by the Curators. All three work together and are necessary.

Most have more than one role.

As part of my own development (and those I work with), I’m going to begin a series about each of these participation methods and how they fit together.  My first article will be a call for action to those in a coma.

It’s time to wake up!

Stay tuned!

Aaron@Biebert

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