Pop Goes the Klout Influence Bubble

Remember the dot com bubble?

Webvan.com and Pets.com were nice ideas, but they didn’t deserve the levels of investment or credibility they received. At best, they were ahead of their time.  The dot com bust ensued.

Wherever there is hype, a bubble is right behind.

Klout is getting a lot of hype right now, and we may be facing an “online influence bubble”.  It’s a bubble driven by passionate people like me that wanted to believe our hard work and social networking success could be easily measured with an algorithm and score.

I wanted to believe in a shortcut, that technology could accelerate a rise to the top, that I could use content and engagement to bypass the old waiting game.

Sadly, it’s not there yet.

It simply can’t measure influence correctly.  Yes, those with high Klout scores are usually influential people online, but what about everyone it misses?  What about Jack Welch?

Online influence is not the main type of influence, yet.

Until it is (I believe it’s headed that way), we must remember offline influence is still how most decision makers make decisions.  This doesn’t mean that Klout is irrelevant, it just means that it’s not a mission critical issue for leaders right now.

Unless you are an internet marketer, social media consultant or blogger, Klout is not something critical to your career.  That may change, but first the bubble will pop and we’ll rebuild this online influence measurement idea without the hype.

I’d love to hear your thoughts.  Here is a brief overview of my personal thoughts:

  1. Due to it’s growing power, Klout needs to self regulate itself
  2. Web 3.0 is here and Klout matters
  3. Offline influence is deeper than online Klout
  4. We have probably over-hyped Klout now (this post)

I hope this is my last Klout post for a while.   Scientific measurement of human influence is a relatively new concept, and I appreciate your patience and comments while I develop my position.  I realize it seems like some flip flopping, but I can assure you I don’t have bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

Have a great night

Aaron@Biebert

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Part 3: How to Start Using Social Media

In my last couple posts, I hope I’ve done a decent job of convincing you that Social Media might be worth a try.  Now the question is “How?”

The first step is to join some of the free Social Networking sites available.  I’ll talk more in-depth about each one in following posts, but first we need to pick a couple to start with, visit their home page, and register. 

Which ones to join?

There are literally thousands of different social networks to choose from, but for starters, I recommend starting with these two:

facebook.com – Their stated goal is to recreate the human network, and they’ve done so quite successfully.  With active groups, helpful pages, and a system that allows you to focus on people you know, this social network of over 550,000,000 people is the gateway to the world of Social Media.  It’s not just for college kids anymore (you might be surprised how many of your friends are on it).

Linkedin.com – This network of more than 80,000,000 is primarily for leaders and professionals.  With excellent groups and many of your colleagues already on there, it’s a great place to share professional information and stay informed.  Every Fortune 500 company has members on it, and it’s a must for anyone looking to lead others during this digital age.

(Extra Credit)  

twitter.com – If you’ve already joined facebook and Linkedin and find yourself looking to try more, I recommend twitter.  Twitter is simple.  Twitter is easy.  160,000,000 people are using twitter to share bite sized (140 characters or less) messages with the world.  You can follow the “tweets” of industry leaders, colleagues, consultants, and friends as they share news, links, videos, and blog postings.

If you have any questions, feel free to post them as comments here on the blog site and my colleagues and I will attempt to answer them as best as we can.

What’s next? 

I’ll dive into the professional side of facebook.com and discuss how you can make it work for your work in the healthcare industry.  The following day, we’ll focus Linkedin.com.  If you’d like to get these sent to you via email, just subscribe on the upper right side of ClearMatters.com.

See you tomorrow!

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He also enjoys teaching, speaking, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare. 

Part 2: Why Should You Care about Social Media?

Yesterday I made the point that we aren’t just using the Internet as a tool anymore, but rather that we are becoming a part of it.

If you buy into that point, then you need more than a modem or router to access this new internet.  You need Social Media.  All the helpful information shared by your peers, industry changing discussions taking place right now, real-time news…it’s available through Social Media. 

Social Media is what connects us to each other.

We need to care about Social Media because it’s the new way people are interacting with the world.  Every Christmas I get fewer and fewer Christmas letters from family and friends, and they’re not coming in email either.  Their updates are happening every day (or every hour sometimes) on facebook, YouTube, twitter, and other Social Media sites.

The fact of the matter is that if you don’t embrace Social Media, you risk missing out on pictures and videos of family, invitations to events, or exciting announcements like engagements, babies, or awards.  Basically, you risk missing out on a big part of our world.

That includes your work world too.

Industry news, peer support, and networking are all happening online right now on the new internet, the social internet.

Now that we’ve established the “Why”, I’d like to talk about the “How” tomorrow.  If you’d like to continue the discussion, I invite you to subscribe to this blog on the upper right side of the blog page (http://www.ClearMatters.com).

Have a great day!  We’ll continue this tomorrow.

 

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He also enjoys teaching, speaking, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare. 

Part 1: What is Social Media?

 

I’d like to start this series by defining “What is Social Media?”

The definition of social in this case refers to living within a community, not necessarily the fun or trivial type of social you might picture when thinking of parties.  Social means community. 

As for the word “media”, there is no clear definition of what makes a website or online service “social” and just like many concepts, it has taken on a life of its own.  However, one thing remains clear:  The rise of Social Media and the activity of “Social Networking” marks a fundamental change in how we use the Internet.

In the past, the internet was a tool you used to get information from websites in a one way fashion, from the website to you.  Now, the Social Media revolution has created a more social, collaborative, interactive and responsive web.  This marks a change in us as a society and the Internet as a technology.

Today, we aren’t just using the Internet as a tool — we are becoming a part of it.

What is Social Media? It is the group of tools that create the new web, the human web.

 

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He also enjoys teaching, speaking, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare. 

The Thing about Social Media

 

Do you remember when email was the “new thing”? 

How about the internet, word processors, or even computers?  It sounds funny now, but I remember people doubting if those tools would be anything more than just a passing fad.  Fast forward to 2010 and I earnestly believe that Social Media is the same sort of “new thing” that we’ll need to learn and embrace to be effective leaders in the coming years.

The only reason I bring this up now is that my last post about “Social Surgery” caused quit a stir.  However, despite all the publicity surrounding social networking, I still see a lot of healthcare leaders questioning the need to join and engage on any social networks at all (i.e. Facebook, Linkedin, or Twitter).  They just don’t see the need. 

Maybe I can help by sharing some of my experiences and research.

All around the world, social media is helping build revolutionary communities that are impacting how people get their information.  Just recently, a study showed that 3 out of 4 Americans get their news from social media or email.  Never before has information or peer support been more available, and social media is playing a big role.

In addition to gathering information and finding free support from peers, social media also makes information about you and your organization (both good info and bad) easier to find and share.  If you’re a leader at a medical facility, this could potentially make your work life easier or more difficult, depending on your ability to recognize both the opportunities and threats facing your department or organization stemming from Social Media.

Learning about Social Media is key, just like learning how to use email was important years ago.

Next week on Tuesday, I’ll be doing a webinar for my HFMA chapter called “Making Social Media Work for You”, and I’ll be sharing some thoughts and research in a series of short morning blog posts until then.  Hopefully they’ll be good practice for my HFMA webinar and helpful for anyone wondering about the value and future of social media. 

If you’re interested in the discussion, comments are encouraged and you can subscribe to the blog postings on the upper right hand side of the ClearMatters.com blog website.

Have a great Sunday!

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He also enjoys teaching, speaking, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare. 

The Clear Medical Network

With the rapid improvements in technology and communication, social networking is thriving and full of new potential.  Sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are known among all people, young and old.  As the dynamics of online communication are quickly becoming more important, companies are adapting to the trends.  One example is the Clear Medical Network. 

It was formed to provide an avenue for networking, discussion, and fun among all different healthcare professionals, as well as provide opportunities through consulting projects, leadership positions, and per diem work to all its members.  Members can also find supplemental health through the network.  Many people have already joined the free network and are intrigued about the opportunities that have already come their way. 

Members are also informed of any upcoming fun events in their area.  One example is a discounted 8 day cruise next year to the Mexican Riviera!  Starting at $319/person, this is not only great fun, but it’s a great value too.

Joining the network is free and takes less than a minute.  Once registered, members are informed of different forums they can join to network with other healthcare professionals within their specific profession as well as other areas of healthcare. 

If you are interested in joining, the site is www.ClearMedicalNetwork.com.  

There really is no downside, and it’s sort of fun to see the other side of things from the perspective of Doctors, Nurses, PTs, HIM Directors, or any of the other professions that are getting involved.

Questions: What do you think of the Clear Medical Network?

About the Author: Sarah Fore is a Staff Writer with the Clear Medical Solutions Communication Team.  Her work is regularly shared on the Clear Medical Agency newsletter and the ClearHIMMatters.com blog.