3 Behaviors that are “Social Selfish”

Yesterday I wrote that “Caring is Sharing” on the social web.

But what about someone who doesn’t share, like, or add to the discussions we all depend on?  What do you call it when someone takes in everything on the web, but doesn’t give back?

I call it being “Social Selfish” and I believe that it hurts everyone.

For the record, I think that we are all self centered sometimes when it comes to social media.  With too much to do and too little time to do it, something must get pushed to the side.  

Sometimes that means less give, and more take.

This post is not about those situations, but rather for those who have never commented or appropriately shared anything that someone else created.

Even though I believe that being “Social Selfish” is bad for everyone, I’m not convinced that people know that they’re doing it.  After all, Web 2.0 and Social Media are still gaining mainstream usage, and people may not truly understand what they’re doing.

To help explain these behaviors and how they hurt us all, here are three “Social Selfish” actions to think about:

1)      They see something amazing and don’t comment.

By not commenting or adding anything, they’re also not helping the material develop.

If a person doesn’t have anything great to add, a simple encouragement or acknowledgement is nearly as helpful.  It takes a lot of time to prepare material, and it’s nice to have encouragement.

For those of us who don’t advertise or promote products on our blogs, these thoughts we write or record are not-for-profit.  We’re spending our time sharing thoughts and ideas for different reasons.

For me, I love hearing new ideas, growing, sharing, and learning.  This community was built for that.  Your comments are payment for the hours I spend each week doing this.

2)      They see something amazing and don’t “Like” or share it (assuming it’s easy to share).

By not sharing, liking, retweeting, or similar action (validating what they think is great), they’re not helping it spread.

Not helping a great idea spread hurts everyone.  In many ways, Web 2.0 is like an information democracy where the best ideas are identified by how many times people share, like, or comment on the idea.  Not liking or sharing is similar to not voting for a leader you believe in.

If you like it, “Like” it!

3)      They take someone’s material and use it without giving others a chance to find the originator.

I frequently see people quoting other people in tweets or emails without crediting the originator’s name.  This hurts the advancement of good ideas and great thinkers, and makes it hard for people to collaborate with the originator.

One of the ways great ideas (and thinkers) advance is through discussions and interaction amongst those “in the room”.  Sharing a great idea allows that idea to gain momentum.  However, sharing the idea without giving credit makes it hard for real collaboration to take place.

We are all pioneers in the Web 2.0 world, and I humbly submit these thoughts for your consideration.  Since I personally have a lot to learn, I welcome any suggested additions or subtractions for the list (let’s discuss below).

Have a selfless night,

Aaron@Biebert

______________

Subscribe to “Thoughts from an 8pm Warrior” via email

Web 2.0 – Why Sharing is Caring

We need each other to make this work.

Instead of the one-way communications of the “old internet”, Web 2.0 is about each of us contributing to a much more interactive and informative network that consists of blogs, tweets, wikis, facebook posts, videos, pictures, and the comments and follow-up discussions that go with them.

We are the creators of the new internet.

The tools we use for the new web are called “Social Media” (think Social Studies, not Social Hour), and they have changed the world we live in.  Instead of sitting in a virtual “lecture hall” listening to a few websites do all the talking (think 1990’s), we are now all in a digital “convention hall” discussing amongst ourselves in one great conversation.

With such a level playing field, the new challenge is not the availability of information, but rather the hunt for the “good stuff”.

  • 30,000,000,000 items are shared each month on Facebook.com (official Facebook stats)
  • 2,890,000,000 tweets are posted on Twitter each month (official Twitter stats)
  • 200,000,000+ blogs had been started by 2009, with many more added each day (Technorati)

That’s a lot of content!

I have absolutely no idea how I would find the best of it without your help.  The content I need is a needle in a haystack without your sharing, liking, bookmarking, reblogging, commenting, and linking to it. Obviously search engines are part of the solution, but they need your help too.

That’s why “Sharing is Caring.”

Share something great tonight,

Aaron@Biebert

______________

Subscribe to “Thoughts from an 8pm Warrior” via email