Medical Professionals Top the List of “Least Productive without Coffee”

I thought it would be fun to share a study I just read while drinking my coffee this morning. 

According to a new survey commissioned by CareerBuilder and Dunkin’ Donuts, the top 5 professions with the highest percentage of workers stating they are less productive without coffee are:

1) Nurses
2) Physicians
3) Hotel workers
4) Designers/Architects
5) Financial/Insurance sales representatives 

Steve's Morning Ritual

Big shocker…right?  ;-) 

With the 24/7 nature of our industry, it’s no surprise that we’re all tired.  One of our nurses regularly drinks a mix of Gatorade and 5 Hour Energy shots, and none of us were surprised when a picture (right) surfaced of one of our nursing/therapy agent’s morning caffeine routine.

“The Coffee Effect”

  • 40% of American workers aged 18 to 24 admit they can’t concentrate as well without coffee.  43% of workers aged 18 to 34 stated they have lower energy if they don’t drink coffee.
  • More than 2 in 5 American workers claim they are less productive without coffee.  Workers in the Northeast U.S. stated they are the most dependent on coffee, with 48% of people claiming they are less productive without coffee, compared to the South at 45%, West at 44%and Midwest at 34%.
  • 37% of American workers drink 2 or more cups of coffee during their workday.

How about you?  Do you need coffee?

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He also enjoys teaching, speaking, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare. 

Medical Heros on 9/11 and today

Yesterday we remembered 9/11 and how it affected our country. TV and the news were saturated with the topic, so I’ll be brief in my remarks.

The ED nurses, doctors, and RT’s that I know are heros every single day, but it warmed my heart to read the story below of the nurse who grabbed two IV’s and headed into two feet of feces to help save lives.

As hard as our work can be in healthcare, we still find a way to do even more when duty calls. Nine years ago we saw it, and in the ER’s around the country I see it every day.

What Did You Do On 9/11? Tomorrow Americans will remember how our country was profoundly changed with the terrorist attacks that happened now nine years ago. Unimaginable horror awaited those who rushed to the scenes of the attacks. Thousands of police officers, firefighters and emergency medical workers offered whatever assistance that they could. They worked tirelessly, not only on 9/11, but for weeks and months to come. While reflecting on the events of 9/11 I came ac … Read More

via Clear Nursing Matters

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions. When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects. He also enjoys teaching, speaking, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare.

Social Media Savvy

(This post is part 3 of a short series on 4 Skills for Healthcare Leaders)

Just like the nurse I mentioned that was tweeting about her boring meeting, your employees and patients are probably tweeting or facebooking about things they don’t like too (or maybe things they do like). 

I would suggest that in order to maximize success as a leader at your facility, you will want to not only listen, but engage your stakeholders in a social way in order to learn more about them and their needs.  Listening to their needs shouldn’t be a new idea, it’s just nowadays when someone is unhappy, 10,000 people hear about it within 5 minutes.

There is no more hiding the bad…or the good!

Don’t believe me?  Check out http://www.SocialMention.com and try searching “Clear Medical Network” or the name of your facility in parentheses. 

Interesting?

The key issue is that your reputation matters for recruiting and retaining hard to find:

  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Surgeons
  • Therapists
  • Executives
  • and others

In order to operate and flourish in an industry facing these shortages of skilled people, you (not just HR or Marketing) will need to find and engage your future doctors, executives, nurses, patients, and everyone else.  On top of that, you also have marketing to patients as well. 

That is why I believe that having Social Media Savvy will be a key skill.

We’ll see you tomorrow for the third skill topic: Caring.

 

Learn about Social Media:

  1. Guide to Twitter:  http://mashable.com/guidebook/twitter/
  2. Guide to Facebook: http://mashable.com/guidebook/facebook/
  3. Social Media in Healthcare:  http://www.ClearMedicalNetwork.com

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He also enjoys teaching, speaking, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare.

4 Skills for Healthcare Leaders

In my opinion, leadership in the healthcare world has seen a drastic shift from just four years ago and it isn’t going back.  The “Good ‘Ol Days” we once knew are now officially gone (I know this may not be breaking news to you if you’re reading this).

For the skeptics out there, I don’t have any scientific research to back this up.  However, when you see the medical world from the eyes of a visiting consultant and interim leader, it is easier to step back and see how fast change is happening. 

For me, it only took a nurse (your nurse maybe?) posting on Facebook about how boring her hospital meeting was…during the meeting.  About 500 of her friends saw it, and they were commenting back.  One of the commentors told her about another job opportunity at a neighboring facility. 

Wow…

It’s things like this that get me thinking.  What will the future be like, and will we be ready?  I was doing some reading last night about future leaders and the skills they will need, and I created my own list of four skills that I think any of us will need to succeed in the future as leaders in a changing industry that will face severe shortages of nurses, doctors, therapists, and others.

  1. Learning on the Fly
  2. Social Media Savvy
  3. A Caring Attitude
  4. “The Champion” Skill

I’d love to hear your thoughts on each of these, as I’d be shocked if someone didn’t have a great 5th skill to add. 

In the coming days, I am going to write a quick series about these four skills and why I think they’re important.  If you’d like to take part in the discussion (or just get the next post via email instead), you can get these posts sent to you by signing up in the upper right of the main page. 

See you tomorrow!

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He enjoys teaching, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare.

Thank You for Your Sacrifice!

Getting called in at 3:00 AM for an emergency…working double shifts when the unit is short…verbal and physical abuse from ungrateful patients…pushing yourself further and further…and further yet. 

For what?

Outsiders would say that it’s for the money, but I find that amusing.  If someone is smart enough to go through all the years of school (and get into that particular school in the first place), they are smart enough to get a very well-paying job that doesn’t have people suing them, barking at them, waking them up, or exhausting them for their entire career.  On top of that, when you take out student loan interest, taxes, and malpractice insurance, the outside world looks even better.

That’s why I believe it is a sacrifice. 

But it’s not just physicians, nurses, or other clinical people.  It’s many others in our industry, as well. 

I know CFO’s and CEO’s working till 9pm regularly to make building projects happen.  I know surgeons that leave home for the OR around 4 AM many days, get home at 6 PM, and then get called back later that day when they’re on call.  Not just for a week, but for a career. 

I know nurses covering double the normal patient loan when the unit is short, and it’s short a lot.  I know specialists that skip sleep after a night of responding to emergencies, just to make sure they get their clinic visits fit in.  I know Agents at Clear Medical Agency who have worked for days (and sometimes weeks) on little to no sleep in order to support these same people during their tough times.

I’ve seen the leadership challenges.  I’ve seen the exhaustion. 

I’ve seen the sacrifice.

For many people around the world, this time of year (Passover and Easter) is about Sacrifice.  I think it’s a great time to thank you for your sacrifice to others.  Pass it on!

For those of you who have to work on Easter.  Thank you for yet another sacrifice.  For those who get the day off, enjoy a well deserved break!

Thank you!

 

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About the Author:  Aaron lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two children and is the President & CEO of Clear Medical Solutions.  When he’s not leading new initiatives, he periodically takes on interim leadership or consulting projects.  He enjoys teaching, writing, and sharing his passion for people and their healthcare.