5 Lessons Learned from Tweeting & Blogging in Pain

Disclosure:  I had surgery recently and am back on prescription Vicodin after trying to get off the pain meds too quickly.  I’m learning some new lessons and think they might be applicable to everyday life.  Hear me out.

We can learn something from my pain.



Here is what I notice as I try to work through the pain and medication:

  • I forget things and I repeat myself.
  • I won’t say things as well as I could if I wasn’t in pain or medicated.
  • I use bad grammer.
  • I get distracted from what I’m working on.
  • I repeat myself after I forget I already said something.

I ramble on.

I wonder if we all make similar mistakes when coping with the pain of going through a breakup, dealing with death, losing business (or a job), or facing other severe challenges in life.

Many try medicating the pain away so they don’t feel it.

Others try ignoring it until they break.

Some try both.

Of course surgery is one thing and life is another.  However, when we see a fellow warrior struggling to get back up after a painful incident, we should help.  For those of us in pain, we should accept help.

We can’t afford to ignore it. We don’t have time to waste.

All of us are guaranteed pain in life.


It’s how we deal with it that determines our future.  We can’t do it alone.

Have a pain-free night,

Aaron@Biebert

PS. If you’re curious how I’ve been tweeting, feel free to follow me at my @Biebert account. Unfortunately, the new new twitter won’t let me reply twice, so I’ve left some of the bad tweets. I probably should take the advice of my doctor and sleep more, tweet less. Let me know what you think.

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Transparency Favors the Strong

Ready or not, the world is getting more transparent.

For people with wrong motives, high prices, or a bad attitude, this could be a very bad thing.  The rest of us should embrace it, even those who love their privacy.

Hear me out.

There was a time when great artists, thinkers, and leaders were stuck in fields of war or the family farm.  How many Leonardo da Vincis have been wasted on the plow or army?

Aaron Biebert in Alaska

For most of history, talented people had no blog, twitter account, or global community to advance their ideas.  There was no internet, media, or bloggers to highlight their brilliance.

Where would the world be if there had been a way to see, share, and embrace the best?

A transparent world gives wings to the brilliant ones and helps them find the pieces needed to create the world’s next great masterpiece.   The rest of us now have a chance to discover and enjoy the best, not just the best connected.

We all benefit in some way.

This is why we need to embrace transparency, not run from it.

Right about now, I can hear the privacy advocates screaming.  I hear their concerns. Yes, we are all human and we make mistakes.  Who wants their dirty laundry out in public?

However, people are becoming more and more comfortable with humanity and all of it’s flaws.  Being “human” is now the hip way to be.  We like transparency when searching for our next great leader, inventor, company, or artist.  It’s the dawn of a new era and we need to embrace it for ourselves.

  • Effective leaders should discuss their reasoning.
  • Amazing artists should share their process.
  • Innovative companies should provide easy access to their prices, people, and profit motives.

The truly remarkable people out there have nothing to hide, and everything to gain. The better you are, the more transparent you should be.

Have a transparent night,

Aaron@Biebert

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4 Things Bloggers Will Love About Triberr!

Do you ever find something special that needs to be shared? Here’s one for all the amazing under-appreciated bloggers out there.

“A rising tide raises all boats”

The other day a friendly fellow 8pm Warrior (Andrew Syiek) told me that I needed to get the 8pm Warrior community involved with Dino Dogan and Dan Cristo and their new Triberr project.  (It’s hard not to believe in Twitter when you see how it brings people/ideas together)

It’s only available by invitation (see below), but Dino was kind enough to invite me into his tribe.  Thanks to Dino, this 8pm Warrior blog now goes out to more than 2,900,000 other people who follow my fellow tribe members.  2,900,000!

How?

Triberr creates close knit groups that “automagically” retweet each other’s blogs at staggered regular intervals (not all at once).

Here’s what that does for a blogger:

  1. Increases exposure to each post. My readership is up 200% since joining Triberr earlier this week.
  2. Provides more value to your followers. Since it provides excellent content from your tribe, your followers get even more good stuff coming from you.
  3. Increases your Klout influence score. Everyone in your tribe mentions you each time you post.  This means major Klout points.  I’m also getting a lot of retweets of the automagic posts (see #2).  More engagement = higher Klout score.
  4. More feedback. Your fellow tribe members will become built-in blog buddies. My comments are up 300%.  (Thanks for all the discussion!)

Dino was nice enough to let me start a tribe for 8pm Warriors and I wanted to invite my fellow blogging warriors to join me.  If you consider yourself an 8pm Warrior and write great content, check out our new tribe and fill out the “Contact the Chief” form to get an invite.

Here are some other tribes that may be interesting to you as well:

If you’re interested in an invitation to another topic, please post below and I’ll see what I can do to help.  Let’s make it special.

Have a great night,

Aaron@Biebert
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3 Behaviors that are “Social Selfish”

Yesterday I wrote that “Caring is Sharing” on the social web.

But what about someone who doesn’t share, like, or add to the discussions we all depend on?  What do you call it when someone takes in everything on the web, but doesn’t give back?

I call it being “Social Selfish” and I believe that it hurts everyone.

For the record, I think that we are all self centered sometimes when it comes to social media.  With too much to do and too little time to do it, something must get pushed to the side.  

Sometimes that means less give, and more take.

This post is not about those situations, but rather for those who have never commented or appropriately shared anything that someone else created.

Even though I believe that being “Social Selfish” is bad for everyone, I’m not convinced that people know that they’re doing it.  After all, Web 2.0 and Social Media are still gaining mainstream usage, and people may not truly understand what they’re doing.

To help explain these behaviors and how they hurt us all, here are three “Social Selfish” actions to think about:

1)      They see something amazing and don’t comment.

By not commenting or adding anything, they’re also not helping the material develop.

If a person doesn’t have anything great to add, a simple encouragement or acknowledgement is nearly as helpful.  It takes a lot of time to prepare material, and it’s nice to have encouragement.

For those of us who don’t advertise or promote products on our blogs, these thoughts we write or record are not-for-profit.  We’re spending our time sharing thoughts and ideas for different reasons.

For me, I love hearing new ideas, growing, sharing, and learning.  This community was built for that.  Your comments are payment for the hours I spend each week doing this.

2)      They see something amazing and don’t “Like” or share it (assuming it’s easy to share).

By not sharing, liking, retweeting, or similar action (validating what they think is great), they’re not helping it spread.

Not helping a great idea spread hurts everyone.  In many ways, Web 2.0 is like an information democracy where the best ideas are identified by how many times people share, like, or comment on the idea.  Not liking or sharing is similar to not voting for a leader you believe in.

If you like it, “Like” it!

3)      They take someone’s material and use it without giving others a chance to find the originator.

I frequently see people quoting other people in tweets or emails without crediting the originator’s name.  This hurts the advancement of good ideas and great thinkers, and makes it hard for people to collaborate with the originator.

One of the ways great ideas (and thinkers) advance is through discussions and interaction amongst those “in the room”.  Sharing a great idea allows that idea to gain momentum.  However, sharing the idea without giving credit makes it hard for real collaboration to take place.

We are all pioneers in the Web 2.0 world, and I humbly submit these thoughts for your consideration.  Since I personally have a lot to learn, I welcome any suggested additions or subtractions for the list (let’s discuss below).

Have a selfless night,

Aaron@Biebert

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Is Your Company a Circus?

It’s my wife’s birthday tomorrow and I took her and my two kids to the Circus this evening.  At several points there were so many great acts going on at one time, it was tough deciding what to watch.

When I mentioned this to my wife, she kindly informed me that this was typical and dated back to early circus styles.  It’s no wonder most traditional circus companies have gone out of business while modern and focused shows like Cirque du Soleil continue to grow in popularity.  It’s about telling a great story.  One chapter at a time.

Is your company a circus?

I don’t mean this in a bad way.  The performers in the arena were absolutely phenomenal and I was very impressed.  It’s just that sometimes they had 12 people all doing their own tricks at the same time, periodically making a frustrating experience rather than one cohesive program.

Sound like your company?

Lately, I’ve been spending a lot of my time in marketing leadership and branding, and while studying several companies I’ve found that the Shriner’s Circus isn’t the only one in town.  It seems to be a challenge for many 8pm Warriors that have several great stories to tell, multiple positive events happening, and so many good ideas.  Instead of synergy, we get quite the opposite.  We get a corporate circus.

Let me know if this sounds familiar:

  • Jane is sending out a mass email over here.
  • John is posting a different corporate Facebook announcement there.
  • Sue is blogging about something completely different than Jane and John on the corporate blog.

They’re all good things on their own, but from an outsider’s perspective it’s hard to focus on one story.  It’s like telling three stories at one time.

It’s a Circus.

This is something to think about if you’re in leadership trying to reach customers who only have so much time and attention to give you.

Weave it all together. Have one voice.  Tell a great story!

Have a great night,

Aaron@Biebert

Why?

I’m doing this because I feel lonely.

It’s not that I’m a loner or anything like that.  If anything, I’m exactly the opposite (I’m an extreme extrovert).  Over the last 6 years I’ve been building communities for people who have a common interest or career (i.e. therapy, real estatehealth information management, jewelry, staffing, nursing, healthcare accounting, etc.).

All told, I’ve made about 80,000 connections, most of whom have no idea who I am, what I do, or what motivates me to spend nearly every waking minute thinking of them and their needs.

Now I need you.

I’ve been reflecting on things, and I realize that I’d like to enjoy a community for people like me.  People who like to discuss big ideas, love what they do, and sometimes stay up all night figuring out ways to make it rain.  I figured you might like it too.

Here it is. Welcome to the tribe for 8pm Warriors!

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Now what?

If you have any ideas, please post below in the comment section or on the wall of the 8pm Warriors Dicussion Forum on facebook.  At first we’ll highlight some big ideas we’re seeing, post your questions to the group for peer support, share info on good books that you’ve read, and any other idea that comes up.

I’m game.

The Dawn of a New Era in Healthcare?

Some have likened the Social Media phenomenon (facebook, blogging, twitter, Linkedin, etc.) to the invention of the printing press and how it has since changed the world.

We completely agree.

In 2009, we built the Clear Medical Network to lay the foundation for a more connected healthcare industry. Now with over 60,000 connections made, we’ve seen the power of the revolution begin to make a difference in the lives and practices of nurses, doctors, and other healthcare professionals.

It looks like we’re now in good company!

The other day, the Mayo Clinic announced the launch of their Center for Social Media, which it says will expand social media tools beyond the traditional marketing role to help staff, physicians and patients stay more informed and connected.

To see a sample of what we’ve been up to and the difference it’s making, check out the blog posting from earlier on our Nursing Blog:

Top Nursing Resources on FacebookWith so many people on facebook now, it is easier than ever before to find resources, support from other nurses, and stay in touch with what’s going on in our field.  We’ve gone through facebook looking for well run, growing, fun places for nurses and we wanted to share some of our favorites: Nurse Circle – Nursing Support and Idea Forum Nurses Night Out – Social Nursing Page ER Nurses – Emergency Room Nurses Group (700 members) ICU Nurses – Cr … Read More

via Clear Nursing Matters

To stay in touch with our movement, we invite you to subscribe to the blog on the upper right side of the Clear Matters blog home page.