Leadership: Motivation Is the Easy Part

This won’t apply to everyone.  If you have trouble staying motivated, my blog isn’t for you.  Try the thousands of CD’s, DVD’s, or books out there designed to motivate you.  (Or try a motivational speaker instead)

For 8pm Warriors, motivation is the easy part.

By nature, we’re motivated people. We have goals.  We have bright visions.  We have big dreams.

Assuming that we also have brains, some level of success is a foregone conclusion.

Unless we get demotivated.

When you find and lead motivated people, remember that the key to success isn’t motivation.  It’s avoiding demotivation.

  • Eliminate distractions
  • Be sensitive to their needs
  • Act respectfully
  • Operate in an open and honest manner
  • Share information
  • Maintain stability

Chances are you already know these suggestions.  Now it’s time to focus on them.

Have a focused night,

Aaron@Biebert

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Published by Aaron Biebert

I'm a director, film/video exec producer, leader & 8pm Warrior. I am passionately chasing my goals at all times. I'm listening. Let's talk!

14 comments on “Leadership: Motivation Is the Easy Part”

  1. I swear the key to sticking to something is human interaction. Maybe I’m alone in this. I don’t think so. Even as an artist I draw HOPING someday I can give the drawing to someone. Nothing in life is as sweet as having someone to share it with. Just seems like whenever I lose focus it’s because I haven’t connected to someone outside of myself and been encouraged. That might sound VERY weak. But to me that’s being human.

    1. Betsy, I agree with you. It’s hard to forget your team members if you’re interacting with them. It’s also hard for them to forget you.

      Humans do seem to be wired to have other humans in their lives. With so many solopreneurs out there, I can see this idea being a challenge. This is one of the reasons that I wanted to start this 8pm Warrior group.

      We need each other and our team needs us.

      Great thoughts!

  2. I agree with Betsy I SURE don’t think it’s weakness ;~*) As a woman, and an Artist, I think it IS what makes us HUMAN, too. (I hope this doesn’t offend and I kind of hope someone can tell me I’m wrong but…)I don’t think that men are driven by encouragement like women are? I have been very de-motivated over the years via LACK of encouragement from others. My friends and I call it “umbition”. In my observation, men are about the $$$, where as I think women would work HAPPILY and be VERY motivated, for FREE, if they got “paid” with words like; “Thank you SO much”, “Good Job”, or “Wow! I’m so PROUD of you!” We DEMAND $$$$ because people DON’T give these words of encouragement very often.

    1. Women and men are wired differently. Pure and simple.

      As a man, I can only speak from my perspective and years of observation with 6 sisters, a mother, a wife, and daughter. It’s probably not as simple as “men are about money and women are about praise.”

      I wish I could boil it down to simple rule like that, but I’ve just met so many different kinds of people from both genders and I’m not comfortable giving more than a generalized opinion.

      To me, women in general seem to be focused on nurturing and men seem to be focused “hunting”. I’ve see exceptions everywhere I look. Some men like to lay at home and have others provide, some women would rather attack you than nurture you. Such is the human race.

      Very diverse.

      1. Omg!!! Just re-read my post…I’m Soooooo sorry ;~*( I didn’t mean to yell.) it was 5:30 in the morning when I wrote it…not a great excuse, but in my head the small letters were at a wisper and the capitols were me doing that loud wisper thing. Lol

  3. Motivation definitely has to be a must if you’re going to be a good leader, esp. in coaching sports. I coach basketball, and I might not be as bright or as smart as some of the other coaches I’ve met, but the guys I have will go to hell and back for me because I motivate and encourage them. Somehow I find that in the business world there are few leaders that I’ve been introduced to that can do the same.

    Thank you for sharing this post!

    1. Jason, I agree that motivation is key for any organization that relies on volunteers or drafted people. Youth sports teams are definitely a whole different animal.

      My thoughts are most applicable to organizations or teams where the leader can pick their team members. In that case, they ought to pick team members that are motivated from within.

      Pro sports is one example. The leaders don’t need to motivate their team as much. They are pretty well self-motivated at that level.

      I agree with your comment that in the business world there are few leaders that can get their team to go to hell and back for them.

      Here’s my take:

      1) The leader is picking losers to be on their team
      2) The leader has inherited losers and didn’t make changes
      3) The leader has winners and is demotivating them
      4) A combination of the above

      Do you agree?

  4. Aaron, you’re so right! I’ve posted on this several times (at least) in the past few years. If we do even a halfway-decent job in the hiring process, we’ll land some terrifically motivated people. They’ll arrive for orientation ready and raring to make a difference – and then somewhere along the line, what happens to many of them? Why are so many originally-motivated people, by some measures up to 80%, turned off by their work?

    The answer to me is in the culture, and the culture is established and maintained by leadership. So employers, if you want to know why your people are so unmotivated, look no farther than the mirror. Are you fair? Do you treat them like adults, and allow them to use their whole brains to help make your company more successful? Or is your company a demotivating disappointment.

    Great post, Aaron. I’m with you!

    1. Ted, I think what you say has some merit, but I don’t know if it goes far enough to address the full issue.

      Nearly every job listing on Careerbuilder etc. is looking for “self-motivated” people (most likely because the HR people placing the ad know the dept managers are incapable of motivating their team.)

      The problem is the candidates looking at Careerbuilder are looking for a job and even if they can manage to “pump themselves up” for a while if they aren’t working in a field that they are passionate about, they will quickly stop motivating themselves.

      I was there. Some days I had to get myself “pumped up” just to force myself to “show up.”

      Now I own my own business. I work crazy long hours. Then I spend an insane amount of time “after hours” doing the back-end work (invoicing, catching up on email, scheduling, social media, writing for the blog, etc). But I am at peace with what I am doing. I make a decent income to support my family and I have no problem “showing up” the next day.

  5. Aaron, you’re so right! I’ve posted on this several times (at least) in the past few years. If we do even a halfway-decent job in the hiring process, we’ll land some terrifically motivated people. They’ll arrive for orientation ready and raring to make a difference – and then somewhere along the line, what happens to many of them? Why are so many originally-motivated people, by some measures up to 80%, turned off by their work?

    The answer to me is in the culture, and the culture is established and maintained by leadership. So employers, if you want to know why your people are so unmotivated, look no farther than the mirror. Are you fair? Do you treat them like adults, and allow them to use their whole brains to help make your company more successful? Or is your company a demotivating disappointment.

    Great post, Aaron. I’m with you!

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